• Op-Ed

    What’s the U.S.’s Best Chance With North Korea? Russia

    Washington and Pyongyang will eventually need to resume direct talks. With neither party ready for that yet, at first secret contacts will have to be organized in third countries. In the meantime, de-escalation is the order of the day, and Russia one of its unlikely brokers.

    • Op-Ed

    China Sanctions Hint of What’s To Come

    Recent US sanctions against China and Russia are signs of the Trump administration’s toughening approach to North Korea. Ironically, these sanctions come on the heels of a UN Security Council resolution imposing new measures against North Korea that the US, China and Russia voted in favor of.

    • Op-Ed

    A Russian Perspective on the Impact of Sanctions

    In order to force Pyongyang to abandon its nuclear and missiles programs, the international community has imposed a set of tough economic sanctions. Do they work? And what Moscow thinks about them?

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    The Real Story of North Korean Labor Camps in Russia

    The U.S. State Department’s effort to portray North Korean migrant labor in Russia as slavery is misguided; working abroad is one of the only ways for North Koreans to climb the social ladder and provide their families with a modicum of financial stability.

    • Op-Ed

    Moscow Calling

    • Dmitri Trenin, Andrei Trenin
    • May 28, 2017
    • International Politics and Society

    Should Trump be ready to offer Kim Jong-un US security guarantees for his regime in exchange for limiting North Korea’s missile program so that the US West Coast remains safe from North Korean projectiles, Russia could also offer to host a six-party summit in Vladivostok so close to the two Koreas, as well as China and Japan.

    • Op-Ed

    Moscow Plays It Cool on NK Nuclear Crisis

    Russia has played it cool in the current North Korea crisis, convinced that the spike in tensions will soon subside. Moscow, however, is under no illusion: The security situation on the Korean Peninsula continues to deteriorate and the next alert is just around the corner.

    • Paper

    The Resurgence of a Market Economy in North Korea

    North Korea has been described as the world’s last Stalinist country. The rhetoric of its officials may indeed be Stalinist, but market forces have played a major role in its economy since at least the late 1990s. The spontaneous growth of free enterprise has been crucial to the North Korean economy’s slow but steady recovery from an external shock.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Moscow-Pyongyang: One Year of a New Friendship

    This year media publications, state visits, and lofty declarations implied an unprecedented boom in Russian-North Korean relations. However, official 2014 statistics paint a different picture

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    How Corruption Saved the North Koreans

    In recent years, North Korea has transformed from one of the least to one of the most corrupt countries in East Asia. But this has been a blessing for its people, both politically and economically

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Why Kim Jong-un Is More Bloodthirsty Than His Father and Grandfather

    Under Kim Jong-un, the repressions against the North Korean elite have reached unprecedented levels since the times of the inter-faction strife of the 1950’s. Such methods of shoring up one’s power may backfire

Carnegie Experts on
Korean Knot

  • expert thumbnail - Arbatov
    Alexey Arbatov
    Alexey Arbatov is the head of the Center for International Security at the Institute of Primakov National Research Institute of World Economy and International Relations.
  • expert thumbnail - Dvorkin
    Vladimir Dvorkin
    Major General Dvorkin (retired) is a chief researcher at the Center for International Security at the Institute of World Economy and International Relations.
  • expert thumbnail - Gabuev
    Alexander Gabuev
    Senior Fellow and Chair
    Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program
    Moscow Center
    Gabuev is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Trenin
    Dmitri Trenin
    Director
    Moscow Center
    Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, has been with the center since its inception. He also chairs the research council and the Foreign and Security Policy Program.

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