• Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Russia’s New Government Is Its Least Political Yet

    Russia’s new cabinet ministers are young, efficient, nonconfrontational, adaptable, and don’t poke their noses into politics. They live in the digital world that is so difficult for the country’s aging leadership to understand. With time, the victim of this technocratic dominance may be that very same leadership.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Russia Prepares for New Tandemocracy

    Putin’s proposed amendments to various roles amount to something resembling an insurance policy, which suggests that the president has already decided who his successor will be, though he may not name that person for another three years.

    • Op-Ed

    Putin Is Planning a Partial Retirement

    The Russian president may never leave the political stage—but he's now ready to take a step back.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Did Putin Just Appoint Himself President for Life?

    President Putin’s unexpected proposals this week to change the Russian constitution prompted the instant resignation of the Russian government. What’s he trying to achieve, and will he succeed?

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Planning for a (Not-So) Post-Putin Russia

    Of the constitutional reforms put forward by Putin, what will really change a lot is the proposal to give the Russian constitution—including repressive Russian legislation—priority over international law. This violation of the usual hierarchy is nothing short of a legal revolution.

    • Op-Ed

    20 Years of Vladimir Putin: How Russian Foreign Policy Has Changed

    Today it makes sense to examine Putin’s legacy in practical regard, through the prism of certain questions: What is of abiding importance and should be preserved for the next generation of Russian leaders? What needs to be changed and developed? What should be best avoided in the future?

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Has Russia, Inc. Stalwart Chemezov Crossed the Barricades?

    Sergei Chemezov’s comments on the public mood in Russia testify not to the specter of a thaw, but, on the contrary, to the fact that the clampdown is in full swing, and only individual members of the inner circle are apprehensive of the authorities’ new radical strategy of repression, which will provoke a new spiral in the war that is already de facto raging between the state and civil society.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Protests Expose Russia’s Regime Rivalry

    Russia’s government agencies are so busy competing with one another and presenting themselves in a good light to the Kremlin that they are failing to deal with the new street protests.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Moscow Protests Are Good News for Opposition–and Siloviki

    This month’s protests in Moscow over city parliament elections are proof that Russia’s non-systemic opposition has taken its struggle to be recognized by the Kremlin as a major political player to a new level. Faced with a foe that has seized the initiative, set the agenda, and brought people into the streets, the Kremlin is at a loss. Its brightest idea, it seems, is to forcibly disperse the protests and prosecute the demonstrators: an approach that risks the state’s takeover by the siloviki.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    As Putin’s Authority Dwindles, Protests in Russia Are Newly Effective

    Having lost his leadership, President Putin now has one chance to carry out major reform that would at least temporarily restore the status of national leader to him. The problem is that after twenty years at the helm, he needs to offer society something a little more solid than the national projects. His final reform must in some sense put an end to the way of ruling the president has adhered to since he first came to power: i.e., using brute force to rule the country.

Carnegie Experts on
Putinology

  • expert thumbnail - Baunov
    Alexander Baunov
    Senior Fellow
    Editor in Chief of Carnegie.ru
    Moscow Center
    Baunov is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Moscow Center and editor in chief of Carnegie.ru.
  • expert thumbnail - Gaaze
    Konstantin Gaaze
    Konstantin Gaaze is a sociologist, and a journalist.
  • expert thumbnail - Kolesnikov
    Andrei Kolesnikov
    Senior Fellow and Chair
    Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program
    Moscow Center
    Kolesnikov is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Movchan
    Andrey Movchan
    Nonresident Scholar
    Economic Policy Program
    Moscow Center
    Movchan is a nonresident scholar in the Economic Policy Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Samorukov
    Maxim Samorukov
    Fellow
    Deputy Editor of Carnegie.ru
    Moscow Center
    Samorukov is a fellow at the Carnegie Moscow Center and deputy editor of Carnegie.ru.
  • expert thumbnail - Stanovaya
    Tatiana Stanovaya
    Nonresident Scholar
    Carnegie Moscow Center
    Tatiana Stanovaya is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Moscow Center.

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