Energy Security

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    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Gazprom’s Battle for Europe

    Why is Gazprom selling gas to Europe below cost? So that companies from the United States and other countries do the same, fall into a price war, and eventually go broke.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    The New Pipeline Making Gazprom Nervous

    The construction of a new pipeline that will send Caspian natural gas to southern Europe is making Gazprom executives uneasy. Once the pipeline is completed, Gazprom will lose its monopoly in southern Europe and may have to resort to price dumping to stay competitive.

    • Event

    Japanese Arctic Strategy and Russia’s Interests

    The conversation addressed the overlapping national interests of Moscow and Tokyo in the Arctic, possible opportunities and roadblocks for Japanese investment in the development of the Northern Sea Route, and business projects in the Russian Arctic, as well as security challenges and ways to mitigate them.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    The Russian Oil Industry in the Era of Cheap Crude

    A recent slight increase in Russia’s oil output is likely to be short-lived. Oil production may start to decline by the end of the year, falling almost twofold by 2035 due to a lack of financing for new field exploration and development.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Crimea Struggles With Ukraine’s New Energy “War”

    Ukrainian political activists have stepped up their campaign to isolate Crimea by sabotaging its electricity supply. Ordinary residents of Crimea are hostages of a hybrid political struggle between Ukraine and Russia.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Russia’s Long-Term Oil Blues

    Russia’s oil and gas industry faces long-term systemic problems, even in the unlikely scenario that the price of oil rises sharply again. This has severe implications for the country’s economic prospects.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Just an Oil Company? The True Extent of Russia’s Dependency on Oil and Gas

    Official statistics suggest that Russia’s oil and gas industry accounts for only a quarter of the country’s GDP. However, when other factors are factored in, the economy is seen to be much more heavily dependent on hydrocarbons. With oil prices looking set to stay low for a long time, this is bad news for the Russian economy.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Maidan Redux in Armenia?

    The Armenian protesters are motivated by socio-economic issues and the desire for social justice—not larger notions of democracy that constitute international human rights advocacy.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Smiles and Waves: What Xi Jinping Took Away From Moscow

    The Xi’s visit to Moscow was the realization of a “win-win” formula beloved by the Chinese. The negotiations between Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin can be seen as a shared symbolic victory and as a broad declaration of good intentions, but the fight over who can benefit more in practical terms has already begun

    • Op-Ed

    Russia-China Talks: Silk Road Leads to Eurasia

    Perhaps the most important document signed by Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping on May 8 in Moscow is the joint declaration on the unification of the Moscow-backed Eurasian Economic Union and the Chinese Silk Road Economic Belt.

Carnegie Experts on
Energy Security

  • expert thumbnail - Gabuev
    Alexander Gabuev
    Senior Fellow and Chair
    Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program
    Moscow Center
    Gabuev is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Movchan
    Andrey Movchan
    Nonresident Scholar
    Economic Policy Program
    Moscow Center
    Movchan is a nonresident scholar in the Economic Policy Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.

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