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24.05.2017
The Silk Road to Nowhere

The Silk Road to Nowhere

It will take years for Russia to increase trade with China. To do so, Russia will need to strengthen its institutions, overcome non-tariff barriers to the Chinese market, and enhance its reputation among Chinese investors.
11.05.2017
What Can Japan Offer Russia?

What Can Japan Offer Russia?

The window of opportunity for improving Russo-Japanese relations is still open, at least for now. Russia’s main objectives are to attract Japanese investment into its national economic development programs and to continue to diversify its policies in the Asia-Pacific and on the international stage, where Japan plays an important and increasingly independent role.
8.05.2017
Mirrored Morality: Russian Society, Eurovision, and a New Ethics

Mirrored Morality: Russian Society, Eurovision, and a New Ethics

Even as Russia officially proclaims moral conservatism, the official tactic of nominating a wheelchair-bound singer for the Eurovision Song Contest suggests a different approach. A political gambit reflects a wider trend. Much of Russian society is becoming more tolerant of difference and more Europeanized than it has been for a century.
2.05.2017
Moscow Housing Demolition Program Creates New Wave of Angry Urbanites

Moscow Housing Demolition Program Creates New Wave of Angry Urbanites

The authorities are in a no-win situation as a result of their unpopular plans to demolish five-story residential buildings in Moscow. If they stick to their guns, angry urbanites are bound to take to the streets in protest. If they yield to public demands, they’ll demonstrate the effectiveness of mass protests.
24.04.2017
Yeltsin’s Overcoat

Yeltsin’s Overcoat

Ten years after Boris Yeltsin’s death, we’re only beginning to grapple with the legacy of his transformative presidency.
19.04.2017
Generation YouTube: How Millennials Are Shaping Russian Politics

Generation YouTube: How Millennials Are Shaping Russian Politics

Millennials are becoming an important force in Russian politics, one that both the regime and the opposition are trying to harness. YouTube, VKontakte, and other social media platforms present a promising way to reach Russian youth.
11.04.2017
The Race to Be Putin’s Next Prime Minister Is Heating Up

The Race to Be Putin’s Next Prime Minister Is Heating Up

How can Vladimir Putin avoid the political fallout that will inevitably come from firing Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev? Facing corruption allegations and losing support within the government, Medvedev is quickly becoming a “suitcase without a handle” for Putin.
10.04.2017
“The Russians Did It”: How the Kremlin Became the Default Culprit

“The Russians Did It”: How the Kremlin Became the Default Culprit

The world will see the Kremlin as the culprit whether or not Denis Voronenkov’s murder is ever solved: for too long, Russian authorities have portrayed their country as one that doesn’t hesitate to violate every international norm—including by murdering their own citizens abroad.
6.04.2017
A Refreeze in Minsk: Combining Crackdown With International Convergence

A Refreeze in Minsk: Combining Crackdown With International Convergence

The West’s reaction to the crackdown on protests in Belarus has so far been muted. Brussels noticed that Belarusian siloviki showed at least some restraint in their response, which indicates that all is not lost. Western diplomats don’t want to throw away years of progress toward convergence with Minsk because of something that could be written off as a brief spark of rage.
6.04.2017
Why the Terrorist Attack in St. Petersburg Is Dividing Russian Society

Why the Terrorist Attack in St. Petersburg Is Dividing Russian Society

There is a broad consensus in Russia that the Kremlin’s hardline stance on terror has kept Russians safe from attack. This guarantee of security has allowed authorities to ignore a host of social and economic problems. But there is a significant downside to this model: any attack on Russian soil begins to erode the underpinnings of the Kremlin’s social contract.
5.04.2017
“We Went Skiing”: How the Kremlin Lost the Ability to Speak Normally

“We Went Skiing”: How the Kremlin Lost the Ability to Speak Normally

Russian authorities have nothing else to say because they have lost the ability to communicate either in real or in virtual time, and they have never learned the language of today’s reality. In this reality, not all dissent is political; some of it is a moral stance against dishonesty.
4.04.2017
St. Petersburg Comes to Terms With Terror

St. Petersburg Comes to Terms With Terror

A journalist in St. Petersburg describes scenes of disbelief, charity, and solidarity as citizens of Russia’s second city reacted to an unprecedented terrorist act.
31.03.2017
The Storm Clouds of 2017: Russia’s New Protests

The Storm Clouds of 2017: Russia’s New Protests

The recent mass anti-corruption protests called across Russia on March 26 pose an unexpected challenge to the Kremlin. The protesters are younger and less prosperous than their counterparts in 2011–2012. If Russia is on the brink of a new kind of revolution, then all sides need to act responsibly.
28.03.2017
The Trump Effect and Russians’ Attitudes Toward the United States

The Trump Effect and Russians’ Attitudes Toward the United States

Russians’ fondness for Donald Trump doesn’t mean that anti-American sentiment has suddenly disappeared in Russia. But even though Trump’s election is unlikely to reverse decades of mistrust, his statements about improving relations with Russia have already had an impact on Russians’ attitudes toward the United States.
22.03.2017
The Power Struggle Dividing Uzbekistan’s Leadership

The Power Struggle Dividing Uzbekistan’s Leadership

In the apparent battle between Uzbekistan’s two most influential politicians, security service head Rustam Inoyatov will have to either support the new president’s agenda, or attempt to return Uzbekistan to the way it was under the totalitarian late leader Karimov. But the resources he has to achieve the latter are getting smaller and smaller every day.
20.03.2017
Three Dimensions: Can North Korea be Contained?

Three Dimensions: Can North Korea be Contained?

In his first trip to Asia, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has had to contend with North Korea's recent provocations and heightened tensions on the Korean Peninsula. Carnegie.ru asked three experts, one in South Korea, one in Russia, and one in the United States, to comment on the question: "Can North Korea be contained?"
14.03.2017
What’s at Stake in the Armenian Elections?

What’s at Stake in the Armenian Elections?

The parliamentary elections in Armenia aren’t just about President Serzh Sargsyan’s effort to stay in power by swapping his current post for the prime ministership. Armenia’s international allegiances are also up for grabs, leaving Moscow to choose between supporting some opposition politicians and simply throwing its weight behind the ruling party.
10.03.2017
Borderline Anxiety: Putin’s Central Asia Tour

Borderline Anxiety: Putin’s Central Asia Tour

Putin’s recent trip to Central Asia showed that he is willing to pay Russia’s partners in the region for their geopolitical loyalty—even if some republics have refrained from joining the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU).
3.03.2017
Russia’s New Old Wave of Technocratic Governors

Russia’s New Old Wave of Technocratic Governors

Revitalizing regional governance will only be possible if the Kremlin changes federal budget appropriations to benefit the provinces in addition to appointing ambitious young governors. Recent gubernatorial appointments should thus be seen as little more than a shrewd PR move by Deputy Chief of the Presidential Administration Sergey Kiriyenko and his team.
21.02.2017
Why Turkmenistan Bothered Holding Presidential Elections

Why Turkmenistan Bothered Holding Presidential Elections

Declining hydrocarbon prices and a gas dispute with Russia have kept Turkmen President Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov from bringing back the luster and prosperity of Turkmenistan’s golden age. The next few years promise to be even harder for Turkmenistan’s economy, which is why parliament decided to extend Berdymukhamedov’s term in office from five to seven years.
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