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    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Out With the Old, In With the New for Russia’s Political Elite

    Putin won’t take all the members of the old guard with him in 2018. They will be replaced by a generation of special service operatives, security guards, and technocrat-apparatchiks in their forties and fifties, who will stand by Putin in 2018 and beyond

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Russian-Turkish Relations: Quick to Destroy, Slower to Mend

    While the Erdogan-Putin summit in St. Petersburg on August 9 aimed to end the conflict between the two presidents triggered by Turkey’s downing of a Russian fighter jet last year, upbeat reports and promises of eternal friendship conceal a long list of problems that can’t be solved any time soon

    • Op-Ed

    Playing the Long Game: Why Putin Won't Call a Snap Presidential Election

    Putin drew several conclusions from the mass protests of 2011-2012. They convinced him that the mandate he received from “the people,” is much more important than the views of the small and overly outspoken segment of progressive citizens.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Putin’s New Personnel Policy

    The Russian political system is changing from within. As Putin continues to appoint new personnel—including a new chief of staff—the divide between insiders and outsiders is disappearing; everyone is becoming part of the system, cogs in the United Putin machine.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Why are Russians Ignoring the DNC Hack?

    Even if Putin didn’t know about the cyber initiative, what‘s truly important is that he is seen as omnipotent by the media and the politicians in the West. Perhaps the blame is undeserved, and Putin’s power is once again being overstated. But that’s the price you pay for creating a political system where everything hinges on the whims of one man.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Following Orders: Putin’s New Strongmen Governors

    President Putin has appointed military and security strongmen to be governors in three regions and removed an unpopular local leader in Sevastopol. He wants to tighten control ahead of the parliamentary elections.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Putin Indulges the Duma

    Putin’s address was deeply conservative in content and artfully liberal in rhetoric. He frames being elected to the Duma as being elevated to the ranks of the chosen few. The right to be a Putinist is celebrated, and it’s out of the question that the institution might let in “irresponsible forces”: real threats to power.

    • Article

    Do Russians Want War?

    War and terrorism have become increasingly routine facts of life in Russia. Since 2014, this reality has become an essential tool for stimulating popular support for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Putin, the Caring Candidate

    Vladimir Putin’s performance at the annual nationwide “direct line” phone-in shows he is again prioritizing domestic politics. His answers signaled the start of a 2018 reelection campaign, as he presented himself not as the global strategist of last year but as a domestic manager once again concerned with ordinary people’s problems.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Putin’s National Guard Gambit

    President Putin’s formation of a new National Guard gives him extra powers as a time of political uncertainty begins. It also helps him cut some strong individuals down to size.

Carnegie Experts on
Putinology

  • expert thumbnail - Baunov
    Alexander Baunov
    Senior Fellow
    Editor in Chief of Carnegie.ru
    Carnegie Moscow Center
    Baunov is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Moscow Center and editor in chief of Carnegie.ru.
  • expert thumbnail - Gaaze
    Konstantin Gaaze
    Konstantin Gaaze is a sociologist, and a journalist.
  • expert thumbnail - Kolesnikov
    Andrei Kolesnikov
    Senior Fellow and Chair
    Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program
    Carnegie Moscow Center
    Kolesnikov is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Movchan
    Andrey Movchan
    Nonresident Scholar
    Economic Policy Program
    Carnegie Moscow Center
    Movchan is a nonresident scholar in the Economic Policy Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Samorukov
    Maxim Samorukov
    Fellow
    Deputy Editor of Carnegie.ru
    Carnegie Moscow Center
    Samorukov is a fellow at the Carnegie Moscow Center and deputy editor of Carnegie.ru.
  • expert thumbnail - Stanovaya
    Tatiana Stanovaya
    Nonresident Scholar
    Carnegie Moscow Center
    Tatiana Stanovaya is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Moscow Center.

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