Russian Ideology

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    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Russian Politics in Ruins: What Vyacheslav Volodin Left Behind

    The political system Volodin leaves behind—that is, a system without any real politics—allows the regime the illusion of control. But the system’s domain has been all but reduced to the tiny world of politicians who agree to the Kremlin’s rules. Activists, ambitious players, and most importantly Russian citizens find themselves outside the bounds of politics.

    • Op-Ed

    A Tale of Two Statues

    If Putin tried to use the figures of Stalin and Ivan the Terrible in the same way, he would be regarded as an impostor. That’s why he is far more comfortable with Vladimir the Great. Besides sharing a name, Putin, like Vladimir, who baptized Russia, believes he is saving Russia’s Orthodox soul.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Sergei Kiriyenko: The Dreamer in the Kremlin

    Many say Sergei Kiriyenko, the new deputy chief of staff of the presidential administration, is a technocrat who was brought in to manage a well-established political system. But there’s more to Kiriyenko: like other disciples of the philosopher Georgy Shchedrovitsky, Kiriyenko believes that reality can be altered and society programmed.

    • Article

    Chechnya’s New Contract With the Kremlin

    Despite Ramzan Kadyrov’s attempts to retain his special status, the old ways of doing business between Grozny and Moscow are over—and the new contract is here to stay.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Against Everything: Russia’s New Majority

    There is a new political majority in Russia. It doesn’t believe in the country’s rulers, its opposition, or its institutions. This nameless, voiceless majority is characterized only by general discontent; it knows only what it stands against.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Authoritarianism by Stealth: Russia After the Duma Elections

    The look of Russia’s parliamentary election was different, even if the results were the same. Russia’s ruling regime is trying to preserve its legitimacy by being more flexible and more respectable. This system may eventually contain the seeds of its own transformation.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Russia’s Lost Liberals

    Russia’s parliamentary election campaign again dealt a crushing blow to the country’s liberal parties, which still believe the key to their success is appearing on television, whether in commercials or in debates. This is a losing strategy; liberals must learn to listen to the Russian people’s needs to garner support.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Dictatorship 101

    Some degree of isolationism—“sovereignty,” in official political parlance—is necessary for every authoritarian regime to survive. But elites and societies as a whole don’t want full-blown isolationism. In Russia and elsewhere, “authoritarian internationalism”—an alliance of quasi-democracies—has come to the rescue.

    • Carnegie.ru Commentary

    Russia’s Militant Anti-Atheism

    Public expression of atheism can now get a Russian citizen punished by the state. The jailing of a young blogger in Yekaterinburg is symptomatic of a culture of intolerance in which church and state work hand in hand.

    • Article

    Another Rubber Stamp Duma?

    The 2016 parliamentary campaign isn’t just a test run for the 2018 presidential race. Russia’s political regime is in search of a governing model that will help it sustain the status quo for the foreseeable future.

Carnegie Experts on
Russian Ideology

  • expert thumbnail - Baunov
    Alexander Baunov
    Senior Fellow
    Editor in Chief of Carnegie.ru
    Moscow Center
    Baunov is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Moscow Center and editor in chief of Carnegie.ru.
  • expert thumbnail - Gaaze
    Konstantin Gaaze
    Nonresident Scholar
    Carnegie Moscow Center
    Konstantin Gaaze is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Kolesnikov
    Andrei Kolesnikov
    Senior Fellow and Chair
    Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program
    Moscow Center
    Kolesnikov is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Movchan
    Andrey Movchan
    Nonresident Scholar
    Economic Policy Program
    Moscow Center
    Movchan is a nonresident scholar in the Economic Policy Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
  • expert thumbnail - Samorukov
    Maxim Samorukov
    Deputy Editor of Carnegie.ru
    Moscow Center
    Samorukov is deputy editor of Carnegie.ru.
  • expert thumbnail - Trenin
    Dmitri Trenin
    Director
    Moscow Center
    Trenin, director of the Carnegie Moscow Center, has been with the center since its inception. He also chairs the research council and the Foreign and Security Policy Program.

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