Putinology

24.04.2015

Closing the Book on Russian Liberals

In order to keep the ranks closed and to sustain the Stockholm syndrome of the fortress’s defenders there must be constant discoveries of “a fifth column” and “national traitors.” That’s the only sense in which Russian authorities need liberals.
23.04.2015

Vladimir Putin’s Wooden Casket

Russia’s current president is not planning on staying at the helm forever, since he is not ready to raise the retirement age. His inaction will destroy Russia’s economy, at the very latest by 2030.
25.03.2015

A Chechen Dragon Splits Moscow

The Chechen connection to the Nemtsov’s murder has split the ruling elite. Putin’s problem is that Kadyrov has completely cleared Chechnya of all rivals, either Chechen or Russian—having fed and groomed his “dragon,” he has no Plan B in Chechnya.
17.03.2015

Life After Caesar: What Happens When the Leader Doesn’t Return

What happens to an authoritarian country that’s left without its leader and the founder of the regime?
17.03.2015

Will the Chechen Connection Lead to Ramzan Kadyrov?

Putin and Kadyrov resemble Siamese twins, whose separation will result in complication for both of them, and thus for the country at large. Neither one of them stood to benefit from Boris Nemtsov’s death.
13.03.2015

Nemtsov’s Murder: The Islamic Connection

The perpetrators of violence have staked their claim to power, or at least a more active role in formulating the regime’s identity and methods. If we are to assume that the president is not directly linked to Nemtsov’s murder, it seems that someone else wants to push Putin in a more decisive and punitive direction.
13.03.2015

The Chechen Connection?

It is impossible to imagine Ramzan Kadyrov calling his subordinates and directly instructing them to commit the murder of Boris Nemtsov. However, the xenophobia and fear of the West characteristic of some segments of Russia’s Muslim community, including Muslims in the North Caucasus, creates a favorable climate for such acts.
3.03.2015

How Will Nemtsov’s Murder Change Political Life in Russia?

In the wake of the murder of one of Russia’s most fervent opposition leaders, Boris Nemtsov, Russia remains less in a state of shock than in a state of confusion about what this means for the country’s future. Eurasia Outlook asked Carnegie’s experts to share their thoughts on how the event will change political life in Russia.
1.03.2015

The Killing of Boris Nemtsov and the Degradation of Russian Authoritarianism

Regardless of who the shooter was and whose orders he was carrying out, a country where a critic of the regime is forced to fear being killed on the street rather than being arrested at a political rally is an entirely different country altogether.
19.02.2015

After Minsk, Is Germany Still a Leader?

If Merkel is synonymous with Germany, then German political and diplomatic weight has certainly risen to the height of true European leadership.
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