20 Years of Leading Analysis

Putin's Return

 

Vladimir Putin has returned to the Kremlin, but he has a different country to rule. It is becoming increasingly clear that Russia will be unable to launch serious social and economic development unless its political system becomes more open and responsive. Russian society has been on the move, with more affluent consumers turning into citizens and the socio-economic demands of the less well-off rising. Putin is powerful, but he is no longer calling all the shots: for the first time in more than a decade, other political leaders are emerging. The new situation in Russia calls for a deeper understanding of the country’s evolution based on new evidence.

  • Eurasia Outlook
    WWI Lessons for Today
    Dmitri Trenin August 4, 2014

    Going to war in 1914 was suicidal for the Russian state. Today, a Russian military invasion of Ukraine might well lead to a catastrophe with dire consequences for Russia itself, or to an all-out conflict between Russia and NATO.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    A Proxy War in Ukraine?
    July 31, 2014

    During the Cold War, both Washington and Moscow actively encouraged, financed, and supported proxy wars across Asia, Africa, and Latin America. In the eyes of many influential figures in Moscow, that is precisely what is happening in Ukraine today.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    A Battle for Russia
    Dmitri Trenin July 28, 2014

    The Kremlin now sees the U.S. goal as the toppling of the Putin regime. That said, expecting Putin to back off betrays a lack of understanding of the gravity of the situation. It is no longer just a struggle for Ukraine, but a battle for Russia.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Heirs of the ’93 Russian White House
    Thomas de Waal July 23, 2014

    The leaders of the Donetsk People’s Republic, Alexander Borodai and Igor Strelkov, are both Russian citizens who worked for the intelligence services, fought in Chechnya, spent time in Transnistria and worked for the ultra-nationalist newspaper, Zavtra. Putin must know that they have become a toxic liability.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    How Long Russians Will Believe in Fairy Tale?
    Lilia Shevtsova June 25, 2014

    Russian state and national identity are still based on the search for the enemy. However, the patriotic euphoria that followed Crimea has begun to wear off. As the Kremlin attempts to understand what to do next in Ukraine, it has become clear that Russians are not prepared to pay for it with their lives.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Putin’s New (Old) Deal
    Sergei Aleksashenko June 24, 2014

    The initiatives outlined by Putin in his speech at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum may lay the groundwork for radical changes in economic policy.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Coup d’Etat in Abkhazia Without Russia’s Permission
    Alexey Malashenko June 19, 2014

    The coup d’état in Abkhazia attracted virtually no media attention in Russia, and even less attention was paid to the parliamentary election in South Ossetia. It seems that after almost six years of Abkhazian and South Ossetian “independence,” these territories stopped being Russia’s headache, only to be replaced by Crimea.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    What Does Narendra Modi’s Victory Mean for Moscow?
    Petr Topychkanov May 23, 2014

    The BJP’s election victory has changed India’s political landscape. Russia has close ties with the BJP, but serious steps are needed to elevate Russian-Indian relations to a new level.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    A Mystery, Wrapped in a Puzzle
    Mikhail Krutikhin May 23, 2014

    The secretive nature of the gas agreement between Gazprom and China National Petroleum Corp may show that the contract contains something the Russian negotiators could not be proud of in the limelight of Russian public opinion.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Anti-Fascism and Its Discontents
    Thomas de Waal May 21, 2014

    The message in Moscow is that Ukraine has been taken over by “Fascists” and neo-Nazis: if the enemies are Fascists, then all means for combatting them are acceptable.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Putin’s Fateful Choice
    Dmitri Trenin August 10, 2014 EL PAÍS Spanish Русский

    Prudence dictates that Russia should not invade Ukraine. However, if Putin decides differently, the Ukraine crisis will immediately become a Russia crisis, and then a European one.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Is Putin Really Cornered?
    Andrew S. Weiss August 8, 2014 International New York Times Русский

    Even now, six months into the Ukrainian crisis, Western leaders don’t know how far Vladimir Putin will go in Ukraine. The United States should immediately re-establish real channels of communication with Putin and his inner circle.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    WWI Lessons for Today
    Dmitri Trenin August 4, 2014

    Going to war in 1914 was suicidal for the Russian state. Today, a Russian military invasion of Ukraine might well lead to a catastrophe with dire consequences for Russia itself, or to an all-out conflict between Russia and NATO.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    A Proxy War in Ukraine?
    July 31, 2014

    During the Cold War, both Washington and Moscow actively encouraged, financed, and supported proxy wars across Asia, Africa, and Latin America. In the eyes of many influential figures in Moscow, that is precisely what is happening in Ukraine today.

     
  • Op-Ed
    China’s Victory in Ukraine
    Dmitri Trenin July 31, 2014 Project Syndicate Русский German

    China will study U.S. strategy toward Russia and draw its own conclusions. Its interests are in keeping Russia as its stable strategic hinterland and a natural-resource base.

     
  • Article
    Ukraine and the New Divide
    Dmitri Trenin July 30, 2014

    The Ukraine crisis has ended the period in Russian-Western relations that began with the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and has opened a new period of heightened rivalry, even confrontation, between former Cold War adversaries.

     
  • Op-Ed
    Europe’s Nightmare Coming True: America vs. Russia...Again
    Dmitri Trenin July 29, 2014 National Interest Русский

    Russia is learning to live in a new harsh environment of U.S.-led economic sanctions and political confrontation with the United States.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    A Battle for Russia
    Dmitri Trenin July 28, 2014

    The Kremlin now sees the U.S. goal as the toppling of the Putin regime. That said, expecting Putin to back off betrays a lack of understanding of the gravity of the situation. It is no longer just a struggle for Ukraine, but a battle for Russia.

     
  • Op-Ed
    MH17, Part of Larger Ukraine Crisis, Likely to be Politicized
    Dmitri Trenin July 27, 2014 Global Times

    The MH17 crisis within the larger Ukraine crisis is likely to lead to the politicization of the conflict.

     
  • Eurasia Outlook
    Heirs of the ’93 Russian White House
    Thomas de Waal July 23, 2014

    The leaders of the Donetsk People’s Republic, Alexander Borodai and Igor Strelkov, are both Russian citizens who worked for the intelligence services, fought in Chechnya, spent time in Transnistria and worked for the ultra-nationalist newspaper, Zavtra. Putin must know that they have become a toxic liability.

     

Carnegie Experts on Putin's Return

  • Lilia Shevtsova
    Senior Associate
    Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program
    Moscow Center

    Shevtsova chairs the Russian Domestic Politics and Political Institutions Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center, dividing her time between Carnegie’s offices in Washington, DC, and Moscow. She has been with Carnegie since 1995.

  •  

Stay In The Know

Enter your email address in the field below to receive the latest Carnegie analysis in your inbox!

Personal Information
 
 
Carnegie Moscow Center
 
16/2 Tverskaya Moscow, 125009 Russia
Phone: +7 495 935-8904 Fax: +7 495 935-8906
Please note...

You are leaving the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy's website and entering another Carnegie global site.

请注意...

你将离开清华—卡内基中心网站,进入卡内基其他全球中心的网站。