New Eastern Europe

8.04.2014

The “Besieged Fortress” Virus

After the Russian annexation of Crimea, the Belarusian President Lukashenko starts creating a “besieged fortress” and mobilizing the Belarusians to defend their country from potential Russian aggression. Moreover, Kazakhstan’s President Nazarbayev may follow Lukashenko’s example. It is clear that the future Eurasian Union cannot be strong.
7.04.2014

Transnistria: A Gathering Storm

Moldova’s government wants association with the EU, but is committed to the “reunification of Moldova” by means of “re-integration” of Transnistria. The reality, however, is that Moldova can be made whole only if it decided to turn east rather than west.
4.04.2014

Russian-Western Confrontation: Prepare for a Long Haul

For the U.S. public and its political establishment, Russia is back as an adversary. Having taken on U.S. power, the Russian state will need to be very smart—and very good—to withstand the confrontation.
3.04.2014

Will the Crimean Tatars Become Russia’s Headache?

The situation around Crimea’s Tatars remains complicated despite Moscow’s evident readiness to compromise.
2.04.2014

Adrift on the Black Sea

The Black Sea region could do with some Turkish soft power, but it looks as though this is not a priority for Prime Minister Erdogan.
1.04.2014

Two Presidents, Two Epochs, Two Systems

Today’s world is again facing the civilizational choice which was recently expressed in the speeches of Putin and Obama representing two civilizations with starkly different norms.
31.03.2014

Europe: The “Holiday From History” Is Over

The continuing crisis over Ukraine has significantly hardened Western official and media attitudes toward Russia. However, with Washington leading the charge and NATO back in the saddle, the European Union is taking a back seat.
28.03.2014

Putin’s Crimean Conquest Pushes Russia to an Anti-Modernization Course

The seizure of Crimea is Putin’s personal conquest, as well as a dramatic reinforcement of his regime of personal power. For now Putin has succeeded in halting Russia’s social and economic modernization and has pushed Russia to an anti-modernization course.
27.03.2014

Despite Crimea, Western-Russian Cooperation in the Arctic Should Continue

  • Sarah Norris
Cooperation among Arctic states is essential to reducing the potential for political, economic, or small military clashes. The fallout from the Crimea crisis, however, could spoil elements of Arctic cooperation.
26.03.2014

Crimea and Karabakh

As soon as the Crimea crisis struck, both Armenia and Azerbaijan immediately hardened their positions on the Nagorny Karabakh conflict.
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